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Interesting Developments In Inheritance Laws

My practice is limited to trials involving inheritance disputes including will contest, related property disputes and associated torts. To ask privately about a Texas litigation issue involving an inheritance dispute, click the big red button to go to our main site's contact page and ask a question privately.

Tag Archives: Wills

Can beneficiaries agree not to be bound by a will?

The quick answer is yes, they can. Texas recognizes what are called “family settlement agreements.”  A family settlement agreement will be enforced by a court even if the distribution of the assets under the agreement differ from the distribution of the assets under the will. … Continue reading

Can two people enter into a contract to make their wills a certain way?

Will Void If Attorney Prepares A Will And Is Beneficiary

Texas will is void if attorney is named beneficiary

Texas Rule

If an attorney prepares a will can the will name him as a beneficiary? The quick answer is no, it can’t.  Texas has a statute that says a devise or bequest of property in a will to an attorney or to an heir or employee of the attorney who prepares or supervises the preparation of the will is void. EC §254.003. In a recent case, an attorney prepares a will. He had a woman working in his office that was an independent contractor.  She claimed that she was not an employee of the attorney.  She was a paralegal but she just did occasional work for the attorney.  She also did occasional work for other attorneys who shared office space with the attorney who drafted the will.  The will made her a beneficiary and also appointed her as the executor of the will.

The Will Contest

A sister of the testator contested the provisions of the will leaving part of the estate to the paralegal.  The court agreed with the sister finding that the paralegal met the definition of employee under the statute and ordered the paralegal to return all of the property that she had received to the heirs of the testator.  The court also ordered the paralegal to pay the attorney fees of the sister. The paralegal appealed claiming that the statute did not apply to her since she was not an employee.  The appeals court disagreed and denied her appeal.  Jones v Krown.

Note:

A 2015 case out of Michigan indicates that Michigan law is different from Texas law. The Michigan case held that a will prepared by an attorney that left the attorney property was not necessarily void. The court held that under Michigan law, if the attorney could plead and prove that he did not unduly influence the testator, the will could be probated. The difference between Michigan and Texas is that a Texas statute declares the will void. There is no need to find that the attorney used undue influence. In Michigan, the rule is in their attorney’s Rules of Professional Conduct which are guidelines for attorneys’ conduct but don’t have the force of law like a statute. The attorney is presumed to have unduly influenced the testator but if the attorney can plead and prove that he did not exert undue influence, the will and the gift can be upheld. Florida has a similar rule, e.g. a gift to the attorney who prepares the will or his employees is not void but only voidable if undue influence can be shown.
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Can you replace pages in your will?

If you have a will and you decide to make changes to it, can you take out a page and replace it? If you replace pages and then re-execute the will with the formalities required of a will, you can make changes.  However, if you… Continue reading

Should I have a will?

The short answer is yes. If you don’t have a will, your estate will go to your heirs as determined by statute. That may be what you want but what if you are married and have children from a prior marriage. If you die without… Continue reading

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We handle litigation involving inheritance disputes. We don't prepare wills. We handle a select few cases on contingency. Don't use a comment to ask a personal question about an inheritance issue because your name and comment will be public. To ask a litigation question and to protect your privacy, click the red button to the right.


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